Botox

Everything you need to know about Botox

Botox is used medically to treat certain muscular conditions, and cosmetically to remove wrinkles by temporarily paralyzing muscles. It is made from a neurotoxin called botulinum toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

Although Botox is a powerful poison, when used correctly, it has a number of applications.

In this article, we will explain how it works, what Botox is used for, and talk about any side effects and dangers.

Fast facts on Botox:

  • Botox is the most popular non-surgical cosmetic treatment, with more than 6 million Botox treatments administered each year.
  • Botox is a neurotoxin derived from Clostridium botulinum, an organism found in the natural environment where it is largely inactive and non-toxic.
  • Botulinum toxin is used to reduce fine lines and wrinkles by paralyzing the underlying muscles.
  • People also use Botox to treat excessive sweating, migraines, muscular disorders, and some bladder and bowel disorders.
  •  Botulism, an illness caused by botulinum toxin, can cause respiratory failure and prove deadly.
  • Just 1 gram of botulinum toxin could kill over 1 million people. Two kilograms could kill the entire human population of Earth.

What is Botox?

Botox injections have a range of medical uses.

Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium from which Botox is derived, is found in many natural settings, including soil, lakes, and forests.

The bacterium can also be found in the intestinal tracts of mammals and fish and in the gills and organs of crabs and other shellfish. Such naturally occurring instances of Clostridium botulinum bacteria and spores are generally harmless. Problems only arise when the spores transform into vegetative cells and the cell population increases. At a certain point, the bacteria begin producing botulinum toxin, the deadly neurotoxin responsible for botulism.

Neurotoxins target the nervous system, disrupting the signaling processes that allow neurons to communicate effectively.


Case Study

Botulinum toxin is administered by diluting the powder in saline and injecting it directly into neuromuscular tissue. It takes 24-72 hours for botulinum toxin to take effect. In very rare circumstances, it may take as long as 5 days for the full effect of botulinum toxin to be observed.

Botulinum toxin should not be used in pregnant or lactating women, or by people who have had a previous allergic reaction to the drug or any of its ingredients.

Specialist

Not Specified

Disclaimer

Possible side effects of a Botox injection include migraines, nausea, double vision, and general malaise.

Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and there are few side effects. In rare cases, an individual may have a genetic predisposition that results in a mild, transient unusual response to the drug.

Around 1 percent of people receiving injections of botulinum toxin type A develop antibodies to the toxin that make subsequent treatments ineffective.

Along with its intended effects, botulinum toxin may cause some unwanted effects. These can include:

  • Mild pain, local edema (fluid buildup) and/or erythema (reddening of the skin) at the injection site.
  • Numbness.
  • Headache.
  • Malaise - feeling generally unwell.
  • Mild nausea.
  • Temporary unwanted weakness/paralysis of nearby muscles.
  • Temporary upper lid or brow ptosis (drooping).
  • Weakness of the lower eyelid or lateral rectus (a muscle controlling eye movement).
  • Dysphagia - trouble swallowing.
  • Neck weakness.
  • Flu-like illness.
  • Brachial plexopathy - a condition affecting the nerves either side of the neck and chest.
  • Gallbladder dysfunction.
  • Diplopia (double vision).
  • Bleeding.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Decreased eyesight.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Fatigue.
  • Hives.
  • Rashes.
  • Wheezing.
  • Swelling.

Botulinum toxin's popularity continues to increase, with cosmetic minimally-invasive botulinum toxin type A procedures up 700 percent since 2000, to 6.3 million in 2013.

Frequently Asked Questions About This Procedure

Anti Wrinkle Injections Dysport Or Botox - Which One Wins?

       When contracting the muscles on their faces after a cosmetic procedure around their eyes, the majority of patients and doctors commented that Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA) fared better than Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA). However, while facial muscles were at rest there appeared to be no significant difference between the two, scientists from the University of California, San Francisco wrote in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

© 2019 Cosmetic Kerala